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Good Question: What's with the names on RTS Buses?

June 20, 2017 06:12 AM

Many of you either ride a public transit bus or pass them on the streets in the Rochester area. Have you noticed the names printed in cursive on the sides of many buses?

Pat Taney was asked how the buses are named and why. We found several buses named Peighton, Lauren and D'wayne.

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 “I had no idea why those names are there," said transit rider Tim Letz.

Neither did we, until we asked Transit Operator Alanda Jones.

Taney: How are they named?

Jones: They are named for the children and grandchildren of employees here at RTS

All three of Jones' grandkids have a bus.

"Y'anna is bus 374, Amari is 383 and Dwayne he is 1609." Jones said.

The naming of buses began in 2009 as a way to honor employees and their families.

"This was way to connect the family with what their parents and grandparents do." Said RTS C.E.O. Bill Carpenter.

Here's how it works, employees enter their child or grandchild’s name into a drawing, Carpenter randomly picks a name and the winner gets a bus named after them. A bus naming ceremony follows for the entire family.

It's a proud moment for the employees but even more so for the kids.

"It's a big thrill and big deal for them to see their bus go down the road." Said Jones.

The names typically stay on the buses for up to 12 years.

Many of you either ride a public transit bus or pass them on the streets in the Rochester area. Have you noticed the names printed in cursive on the sides of many buses?

Pat Taney was asked how the buses are named and why. We found several buses named Peighton, Lauren and D'wayne.

 “I had no idea why those names are there," said transit rider Tim Letz.

 Neither did we, until we asked Transit Operator Alanda Jones.

Taney: How are they named?

Jones: They are named for the children and grandchildren of employees here at RTS.

All three of Jones' grandkids have a bus.

"Y'anna is bus 374, Amari is 383 and Dwayne  is 1609," Jones said.

The naming of buses began in 2009 as a way to honor employees and their families.

"This was way to connect the family with what their parents and grandparents do," said RTS CEO Bill Carpenter.

Here's how it works -- employees enter their child or grandchild’s name into a drawing, Carpenter randomly picks a name, and the winner gets a bus named after them. A bus naming ceremony follows for the entire family.

It's a proud moment for the employees, but even more so for the kids.

"It's a big thrill and big deal for them to see their bus go down the road," said Jones.

The names typically stay on the buses for up to 12 years.

Credits

Pat Taney

Copyright 2017 - WHEC-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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