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Ranked choice voting remains law of the land in Maine

Ranked choice voting remains law of the land in Maine

July 16, 2017 05:13 PM

Though the Maine Supreme Court has deemed it unconstitutional, ranked choice voting is still the law of the land.

Lawmakers this year were unable to agree on killing the voter-approved law or changing the constitution, meaning it stays on the books. Several among them have described the situation as the option that no one wants. The stalemate also leaves Maine open to a possible lawsuit.

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However, the development is welcomed by supporters of ranked choice voting, saying that it lessens the impact of spoiler candidates around in future electoral races. The 2016 presidential race in particular brought about much discussion about the impact of third party candidates, and questions about the legitimacy of a two party system, making this a personal issue for many voters. 

Ranked choice voting is backed by Maine voters, with 52 percent of Maine voters in November approving the new system that lets voters rank the candidates in order of preference instead of voting for a single candidate. Maine, so far, is the only state to do so.

Lawmakers are talking about tackling the thorny issue again in January of 2018. 

Though the Maine Supreme Court has deemed it unconstitutional, ranked choice voting is still the law of the land.

Lawmakers this year were unable to agree on killing the voter-approved law or changing the constitution, meaning it stays on the books. Several among them have described the situation as the option that no one wants. The stalemate also leaves Maine open to a possible lawsuit.

However, the development is welcomed by supporters of ranked choice voting, saying that it lessens the impact of spoiler candidates around in future electoral races. The 2016 presidential race in particular brought about much discussion about the impact of third party candidates, and questions about the legitimacy of a two party system, making this a personal issue to many voters. 

Ranked choice voting is backed by Maine voters, with 52 percent of Maine voters in November approving the new system that lets voters rank the candidates in order of preference instead of voting for a single candidate. Maine, so far, is the only state to do so.

Lawmakers are talking about tackling the thorny issue again in January of 2018. 

Credits

Associated Press

(Copyright 2017 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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